Tag Archives: gluten-free

Chocolate Almond Delights

These are a spin on my vanilla macaroon melts— with extra almond flavor and dark chocolate.  Because unless you’re my sister-in-law who genuinely dislikes chocolate (yes really), I’m pretty sure we could all use a nice and tasty, feel good serotonin boost right now.  I myself have been fairly consumed with apartment hunting, ever since we received notice that our landlord is moving in and that we need to be out by the end of May.  Despite my being something of an anxious wacko lately who checks Street Easy and Trulia every half hour, I am of course aware of just how incredibly lucky we are; I know that no matter what we will have a place to live.  Even if it’s crappy.  Even if it’s with our parents.

Still, it’s hard not to feel a bit sad.  We’ve been here for over nine years.  And even though Phil and I were technically adults when we moved in together, it was over the course of living here that we actually grew up.  We experienced the amazing and the truly horrible and everywhere in between here.  We grew as a couple, adopted our cat Mica, got married.  I started One Window Kitchen in our one window kitchen with peeling yellow wallpaper, cracked walls and floor, and the beautiful painted tin ceiling that you see here as the background.

It’s a big change. I am actually really excited to live some place new, though.  Maybe our new apartment will even be nicer.  (As much as I love our place, “well-maintained” is not a term I have or ever would associate with it.)  We probably won’t stay in the neighborhood and may very well move to another borough altogether (WHAT UP QUEENS).  New York City is vast and it will be interesting to experience a completely different part of it.  And if we hate it, we can always hop on the subway and escape.

 

*Tip: If you have any leftover melted chocolate (and don’t feel like spooning it straight into your mouth), save it by pouring it onto some parchment paper and freezing.

½ cup blanched sliced almonds
20-30 more blanched sliced almonds (for subtle crunch) OR 10 whole roasted almonds (for more crunch)
½ cup + ½ tbsp unsweetened shredded/desiccated coconut
¼ cup + ¼ tsp virgin coconut oil
1/16 tsp fine sea salt
1 tsp almond extract
¼ tsp vanilla extract
2 tbsp maple syrup
1 3 oz bar dark (56-71%) chocolate, chopped

  • Line a small baking sheet or tray with 10 mini muffin liners.
  • In a food processor, process the ½ cup sliced almonds and ½ cup of shredded coconut for about 1 minute, forming a coarse flour/meal.
  • Melt the ¼ cup of coconut oil, and add to the food processor along with the salt, vanilla, and maple syrup.  Process for another 30 seconds or so, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl if needed, until well combined.
  • Spoon the mixture into the mini muffin liners.  Top each one with 2-3 sliced almonds (or 1 whole roasted almond), pressing down gently, and sprinkle on the remaining ½ tbsp coconut.  Freeze for at least 30 minutes.
  • Gently melt chocolate and remaining ¼ tsp coconut oil together, either in a double boiler over low heat or in a bowl in the microwave for short increments (20 seconds or so), stirring frequently either way.  Once melted, remove chocolate from heat.
  • Remove frozen almond coconut patties from liners and set in a separate dish.  One at a time, drop each patty into the chocolate and use a fork to roll it around, then gently lift and let excess chocolate drip back down through the fork tines.  Place back on liner.  Work quickly for best results.  Freeze for 10 minutes, then transfer to a container and store in the refrigerator (or in the freezer if you want them to last longer).

Yield: 10 chocolate almond delights

 

Noochy Hemp Sprinkle

For putting on everything.  Hemp seeds and nooch– or nutritional yeast, if you’re not a seasoned vegan– combine to make a super tasty, savory condiment that’s good for you, too.  I’ve been sprinkling it on avocado toast, rice and beans, pasta, soup, and basically whatever else where I want to add a delicious cheesy/umami richness and a nice boost of protein, B vitamins, and omega-3s.  I plan on trying it on roasted broccoli real soon and also bet it would be fab on popcorn.  And potatoes. And polenta.  It’s kind of addictive.

½ cup hulled hemp seeds/hearts
¼ cup nutritional yeast flakes
¼ tsp garlic powder
scant ¼ tsp fine sea salt

Add everything to a food processor and process for about 30-45 seconds, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl as needed, until ingredients form a fine crumb.  Transfer to a jar/air-tight container and store in the fridge.

Yield: About ¾ cup

Vanilla Macaroon Melts

“Have a macaroon,” my great aunts would say, pulling an old Manichewitz tin from the cabinet.  Florence and Lily were my grandmother’s little sisters, who never married but instead grew old together in New York’s East Village. Their apartment on E. 6th Street contained an ancient sofa I never dared sit on, an electric piano, mysterious bedrooms, a television tuned into the news, thick carpets, and thick layers of dust– at least in their final years.  I once got trapped in their bathroom for at least 15 or 20 minutes.  They said things like “Jeepers!” and on some Thanksgivings my dad would pick them up and bring them over so my sister and I could meticulously make them brie and cracker sandwiches.  It wasn’t until I was older that I could appreciate their spunk and wit, and their love for both the city and one another.

I have no idea whether or not Florence and Lily (yes they are always together in my mind) would like these vanilla macaroon melts; they’re a far cry from those Manichewitz cookies.  Still, I’d like to think they’d approve of the update.  After all, they were modern women who loved a good bite.

  

*Do not use regular raw almonds here.  The measurements will be off and the skin will change the texture.  Unless I’m baking, I stay far away from (unsoaked) whole raw almonds because I’ve discovered the hard way that I cannot digest the skin.  At all.  Apparently I’m not alone.
*I measure the coconut oil in its solid form, then scoop it into a mug and microwave for 20 seconds to melt.

½ cup blanched sliced almonds
½ cup unsweetened shredded/desiccated coconut, plus a bit extra for sprinkling
¼ cup virgin coconut oil, melted
1/16 tsp sea salt
½ tsp vanilla extract
2 tbsp maple syrup

  • Line a small baking sheet or tray with 10 mini muffin liners.
  • In a food processor, process the sliced almonds and coconut for about 1 minute, forming a coarse flour/meal.
  • Add the melted coconut oil, salt, vanilla, and maple syrup.  Process for another 30 seconds or so, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl if needed, until well combined.
  • Spoon the mixture into the mini muffin liners, filling up about half to two-thirds way full. Sprinkle the extra coconut on top.  Freeze for 15 minutes, to quickly firm up, then transfer to the refrigerator.  Keep refrigerated.

Yield: 10 macaroon melts

Spicy Cabbage & Tofu with Peanuts

spicy cabbage and tofu with peanuts

Fresh cabbage is not something I typically buy.  For me, it usually conjures images of sad plops of diner coleslaw and The Kids in the Hall.  When shopping I pass right by those pale green heads (and even the purple ones) in favor of darker leafy things like kale and chard, or more exciting things like tatsoi and romanesco.  Still, the beautiful varieties at the farmer’s market piqued my interest and made me reconsider.  Stir-fried with ginger, garlic, peanuts, tofu, and hot sesame oil, cabbage is totally delicious– and not at all reminiscent of coleslaw.  I’m craving some right now.
*I thought this was spicy!  Not too spicy with rice, though.  And perfect if your head gets extra stuffy this time of year like mine does.  Of course Philip added hot sauce anyway. If you prefer a less spicy dish, reduce the amount of hot sesame oil or cut with some toasted sesame oil.  For a totally mild dish, replace completely with toasted sesame oil.

cone cabbage  shredded cabbagetofu

For tofu:
1 block extra-firm tofu
½ tbsp grapeseed or other hot cooking oil (peanut, canola, refined coconut, etc.)
½ tsp garlic powder
½ tsp coconut sugar
½ tbsp tamari

For everything else:
1-1½ tsp grapeseed or other hot cooking oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tbsp minced ginger
1 medium head of cabbage, trimmed of outer leaves and core, cut into thin shreds
1 tbsp tamari
½ tbsp rice wine vinegar
½ tsp hot sesame oil
¼ cup peanuts (I used roasted and salted)
Rice, for serving

  • Pat tofu with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Cut into 1” cubes, then pat again to soak up extra moisture.
  • Heat ½ tbsp grapeseed oil over medium-high heat. Add tofu cubes, sprinkle with garlic powder and coconut sugar, and stir gently to distribute seasonings. Then let cook—without touching– for about 3-4 minutes, or until golden and a bit crispy. Carefully flip over (turn down the heat while you do this) and splash with ½ tbsp tamari. Cook for 3-4 minutes more. Turn off burner and transfer tofu to another dish. Let the pan cool a bit and then give it a wipe to remove any blackened bits.
  • Heat 1-1½ tsp grapeseed (or other) oil in pan over medium heat, and add the garlic and ginger. Cook for about 2 minutes, stirring frequently, until fragrant.
  • Stir in cabbage. Splash with a tiny bit of water and cook for a couple of minutes, stirring as needed. Add tamari and rice wine vinegar and cook for a couple minutes more.
  • Add the tofu, peanuts, and hot sesame oil, and cook for another minute or two. Taste for seasonings and serve with rice.

Yield: About 3-4 servings

cabbage

Black-Eyed Pea Salad with Ginger Miso Dressing

Black-eyed pea salad with ginger miso dressing

It’s been a helluva week, to say the least.  Salad might not exactly be the most obvious comfort food, but having a big batch in the fridge certainly helps make lunchtime easier (and healthier).  This one is earthy, crunchy, full of spice and umami warmth, with bright herbal notes.  Black-eyed peas are often eaten on New Year’s Day as a good luck food; I say we take all the good luck we can get.

black eyed pea salad ingredients

Obviously we can’t rely on luck alone. I don’t care if I’m bringing politics into a place where it doesn’t belong because A) it’s my blog and I do what I want, and B) what’s happening goes way beyond liberal and conservative and into the realm of right and very, very, very wrong.  None of this is normal or okay, and we must remain vigilant. We need to seek out reliable news sources and stay informed.  We need to be active.  We need to stand up to bigotry and hold our leaders accountable.  We need to help out where we can and support organizations that do good work (Jezebel posted a pretty comprehensive list, to which I would add NRDC).  Stay strong, friends.

Black-eyed peas

3 cups cooked black-eyed peas, if canned then rinsed & drained
1-2 radishes, sliced into thin half-moons
1 cucumber, sliced into thin half-moons
1 scallion (white and light green parts), thinly sliced
3 tbsp mellow white miso
1 tbsp grated ginger
1½ tbsp olive oil
1½ tbsp water
handful of parsley, chopped
salt (if needed; miso is salty) & black pepper, to taste

  • To make the dressing, whisk together the miso, ginger, olive oil, and water.
  • Toss the black-eyed peas, radish, cucumber, and scallion together with most of the dressing, setting some aside for left-overs (the black eyed peas really soak it up!), and stir to coat evenly.  Gently mix in most of the parsley, saving a little bit for sprinkling on the top, and season to taste.  Garnish with remaining parsley.

Yield: About 6 servings

Black-eyed pea salad with ginger miso dressing